Skip to main content

About your Search

20121222
20121222
STATION
CSPAN2 7
SFGTV2 5
KGO (ABC) 3
KRCB (PBS) 3
KTVU (FOX) 3
CSPAN 2
KPIX (CBS) 2
KQEH (PBS) 2
CNNW 1
KICU 1
KQED (PBS) 1
SFGTV 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 34
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
meeting, from the breast cancer fund, we have my two science leaders, [inaudible] and janet gray, so science questions galor, they can handle them all, policy questions, we'll have to deflect some of those to nancy for another time, so what i'm going to present today is what we call our healthy home and healthy world tours, i'll talk a little bit about who the breast cancer fund is and then we're going to walk through kind of the rooms in your home talking about tips for avoiding exposures that are linked to breast cancer and i will talk a little bit about the different chemicals, where they're found, things you can do to avoid them and also some policies, and then we'll kind of go beyond the home to talk about the kinds of exposures that might be not within our control in the house but elsewhere. and it looks like i have videos so that is good. so, the breast cancer fund is a national organization that works to prevent breast cancer by eliminating the environmental exposures linked o the disease, mostly we talk about chemicals and radiation that are linked to breast cancer, we are a
the politics, what fdr called the science of human relationships, paid off. and i think that that's hugely important. and i mean it. i mean, dinner does not always end well. you can talk to jesus about that, you know? [laughter] never mind. never mind about that. [laughter] that's not here. last thing quickly, the politics of hope, every successful american president has convinced us that present pain is really an investment can and that a sacrifice in in the moment is not simply to be austere, for austerity's sake, but to make tomorrow better than today. whatever they can, they will, jefferson of americans. and the idea, he said i like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past which is very painful for me because i like both, of course. but he was able to project a vision of a reality that we could not see, but that he wanted us to reach. and i think that that's absolutely essential. as i said, we always learn more from sinners than from saints. his role in the perpetuation and protection of slavery is the great standing conviction, it's not an indictment, it's a convic
. others have operators -- what operators like to call a science fiction movie. that is deliberate. it are modeled after science fiction in order to appeal to the network engineers that are deciding where to put their network connections and where to connect to other networks. when you walk in, it is a bit like walking into a machine. the buildings are incredibly loud and cold from the air- conditioners that keep the machines cool. you cannot see the ceiling. there are usually cages around. big steel cages about half the size of a hotel room. each belongs to a network. that is where they keep the equipment securely. they interconnect aims that way. that is the physical connection. >> when you look at the infrastructure of the wires of the internet, what are those wires made of? >> the predominately centers of the internet, the most important places are fiber-optic cables. there often yellow jumper cables. inside of them are strands of glass. inside of that glass our pulses of light. nano second morse code that can carry a baseline of about 10 gigabits or second of data. maybe 10,00
health and safety information on chemicals, would use the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those happen. the senate is not likely to reconvene and vote on this bill because we are winding down of course with this legislative session and this particular administration in terms of senates turning over, they're all -- most of them are up for re-election, house is turning over -- about half of them are up for re-election and of course presidential election as well, and so it is very likely of course that this will
is look through the social science research of the last ten years and religious diversity whether it is work by robert putnam at harvard or princeton or pew and galloped and brown and all the social science research and ask the question of effectiveness. what does this teach us? and what you come up with is a very simple model called the interfaith triangle. we know based on the social science research that if you know one person of a different religious background. if you have a single meaningful relationship with the mormon or in evangelical or a muslim or a jew, your attitude toward that whole community improves. in fact, we also know from the social science data that your attitude toward other religious communities improves. we also know that if you have what we call appreciative knowledge of a different religion, something as simple as being about the place of the profit mohammad within islam that your attitude towards that improves. those three things, attitude, knowledge, relationships, deeply connected. what is an effective interface program? by the way, this might sound s
for january 15th. reporting live, health and science editor, john fowler, ktvu channel 2 news. >> ktvu.com has more of the nra's statement today. you can watch the video online. just look under hot topics. >> san francisco giants pitcher made a stop today. talked about the kids. one of his famous strikeout pitches. >> reporter: more than a month may have passed, but sergio romo said as he arrived he's still blown away by it all. including the attention wherever he goes. >> they're here. >> reporter: he's never made a personal appearance at an air force base before. people have been waiting for four hours just to have two minutes with him. some kids got a quick lesson on his slider. he posed with his signature grin for others. for staff sergeant, this was going to make christmas memorable. >> he called me his hero. i couldn't believe it. >> reporter: romo may be the closer forren the giants but he ended up bringing it all home for the servicemen and their families this weekend. >> the latest storm is dumping several feet of snow in the sierra. the snowstorm made driving to the mountains treache
inclined to science and math because i had a great science and math teacher. if you had a device which could be a video of the best teacher ever, which is what many are doing, that may be the best way to teach certain subjects. then that teacher can help reinforce in live mode what is happening have. >> gavin: coaching mentoring organizing. >> and process what else is going on in their lives and help them to figure out what to learn next perhaps which leads us as policymakers and leaders in the world what do we want them to learn now? if we can teach them anything, what should we be teaching them? this crazy age where technology seems to be achieving anything, what do we want our kids to learn? >> gavin: rob, we're out of time. i'm glad to have you on our show. >> thank you. >> gavin: thank you. >> it's been a pleasure. >> gavin: you heard a lot about cool technologies that may change our lives from 2013 from implanted electronic chips to $20 tablets find out why i'm increasingly concerned about the darker side of innovation and what happens between 3-d printing is available to everyon
will continue. investment in science, technology and higher education, encouraging more young people to study science, technology, engineering and math, make sure that we are bringing young minds with the creativity and engineering backgrounds to create the economy is for the future is so important. that has been the lifeblood of the economy and it must continue. saving the manned space exploration program and insuring the long term future of nasa, and essentials generator for our economy, insuring that stay at home moms and dads to work so hard raising children and contributing to the community to save for retirement. and easing the marriage tax penalty by doubling the standard ridge is a few of the things that i hope will continue to be championed as i leave. it has been such an honor to serve in the united states senate and i leave with the hope that the values that built america into
with interactive exhibits making science fun. a memory wall is up now where staff and visitors are sharing photos and thoughts about four decades of experiences here. one of those visitors who came back is brian matthews. >> it made a big impression on my childhood. i have vivid memories of it. >> brian is an engineer with autodesk and expert what is known as reality capture. he decided he should be doing it here. >> i called up our friends, like any other experiment they were game. >> he got a few other volunteers and they are working as fast as they can to make a record of the building and exhibits. they are using a couple different technologies including one that starts with photos from a still camera. you take photos from different angles and an amazing software puts them together. >> it can analyze two dimensional pictures, and make a three dimensional model from an ordinary camera. >> they are icing laser scanners. a sophisticated software programmable analyzes the millions of data points and combines them. the image is so detailed it could create an exact replica of the space and everythin
in 1969, first of the kind exhibit making science fun. a memory wall is up now where staff and visitors are sharing photos and thoughts about four decades of experiences here. one of those visitors that came back to take a look is brian matthews. >> it made a big impression in my childhood. i wanted to save it for the future. >> brian is an engineer with autodesk. he is expert in reality capture and he decided he should be doing it here. >> so i called up our friends and like any other experiment they were game. >> he got a few other volunteers and they are working as fast as they can to make a record of the building and exhibits. they are using different technologies including one that starts with photos from a still camera. you take photos from different animals and feed them into computer and amazing software program puts them together in this incredible image. that software can analyze the two dimensional pictures and make a model from an ordinary camera. >> they are also using laser cameras where the exhibits are. a sophisticated software programmable lies the data points and the r
these are the final days of the place. exploratorium opened in 1969, with interactive exhibits, making science fun. a memory wall is up now where staff and visitors are sharing photos and thoughts about four decades of experiences here. one of those visitors who came back to take a look is brian matthews. >> it made a big impression on my childhood. i really wanted to save it for the future. >> brian is an engineer with autodesk. he an expert in what is known as reality capture. >> i called up my friends, they were game. >> brian got a few other volunteers and they are working as fast as they can to make a three dimensional record of the building and exhibits. they are using different technologies, including one that starts with photos from a still camera. you take photos from different angles and feed them into a computer and amazing software program puts them together into this incredible image. >> that software can analyze the two dimensional pictures and make a three dimensional model from an ordinary camera. >> they are using laser scanners starting in the machine shop. a sophisticated softwa
this evening's collaboration of our national news and science programs. yesterday, she sat down with education secretary arne duncan for the special. it was the former chicago public school superintendent's first interview since the killings. here's part of their conversation. >> secretary duncan where does the responsibility lie for action here? >> it lies on all of us. all of us as parents, as community leaders, as religious leaders, as political leaders. no one gets to pass on this. and this is to the a time to point fingers or lay blame. often these things, there are lots of inclinations to do that but this is complex and anyone who wants to say there is a simple answer here i think does a great disservice to the complexity and urgency of fundamentally trying to make our country a safer place for our children. >> ifill: the president has asked the committee that you will be on, that vice president biden is going to spearhead to come up with solution or approaches within a month, before the state of the union speech. do you worry that the outrage is going to fade before that happens? >> i d
. but it is a poor idea. >> reporter: it is set for january 15. johnhealth and science editor john fowler ktvu channel 2 news. >>> we know the name of a man who was hit and killed while walking his dog yesterday. he is thomas willy. he was walking his dog yesterday morning when he was struck by a vehicle that kept going. he died later at the hospital, his dog was also killed. no arrests have been made. >>> we are on storm watch right now and through the weekend. right now you can see the coverage out there. rain heavy at times. that has been the case. rain showers, scattered in the east bay, parts of the north bay, especially with the darker shades of greens and the yellow. south of fairfield, a third of an inch an hour. we will show you this around daily city in san francisco, approaching ocean beach as well. you will notice light to moderate cells towards the sunset district, and north bay, mill valley, still scattered showers, down pours as well. into the weekend, this is just the beginning. two storms we are tracking. first one tomorrow morning, 5:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m., strongest rain. sun
is recovering and we'll tell you about it next. tell you about it next. i have what science calls the nightly stuffy nose thing. i can't breathe, so i can't sleep. and the next day i pay for it. i tried decongestants... i tossed and turned... i even vaporized. and then i fought back with drug-free breathe right. these nasal strips instantly open my nose, like a breath of fresh air. i was breathing and sleeping better. [ female announcer ] exercise your right to breathe right. get two free strips at breatheright.com. hey it's your right to breathe right. get two free strips at breatheright.com. to the best vacation sp(all) the gulf! it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your mississippi outdoors. i vote for your florida beaches, dawn. bill, this louisiana seafood is delicious. we're having such a great year on the gulf, we've decided to put aside our rivalry. now is the perfect time to visit anyone of our states. the beaches and waters couldn'
somebody or to head off mental health problems. although we're still hoping that science helps to validate that. that's what we think clinically, intuitively. you do want to get in as early as possible. the larger question is the focus of resources and attention. if you look at the new york city area, we had sandy and now we have this terrible thing happen in our broader area. it's very bewildering to keep up with it. it feels very much like after 9/11, the crash of the american airlines 587 and we had anthrax. it was one thing after another. i do think it's very hard to maintain a sustained attention and you just sort of hope that somebody in government and local mental health, local health are keeping their eye
there is no such thing as an abortion to protect a woman's life or health due to "advances in science and technology." and missouri rep. todd akin's infamous remark about women's bodies shutting down to prevent pregnancy in cases of so-called "legitimate rape." stunned lots of women voters. as a result many vots told pollsters women's rights were a concern. in the end the women's vote went solidly for president obama as opposed to gop challenger mitt romney. and none of the three men who made strange statements about women's bodies won their races. on capitol hill the election brought the total number of women in the senate to 20, 16 democrats and four republicans, and 78 women in the house, 58 democrats, 20 republicans. as budget negotiations continued to loom, women were asked whether having equal female representation in congress would have chaed things. >> we would have dealt with that. it's critical to the country. we need to provide certainty for businesses for our families. so they will know what they're looking at over the next year and again as women i think we tend to be consensus builders
for january 15. johnhealth and science editor john fowler ktvu channel 2 news. >>> we know the name of a man who was hit and killed while walking his dog yesterday. he is thomas willy. he was walking his dog yesterday morning when he was struck by a vehicle that kept going. he died later at the hospital, his dog was also killed. no arrests have been made. >>> we are on storm watch right now and through the weekend. right now you can see the coverage out there. rain heavy at times. that has been the case. rain showers, scattered in the east bay, parts of the north bay, especially with the darker shades of greens and the yellow. south of fairfield, a third of an inch an hour. we will show you this around daily city in san francisco, approaching ocean beach as well. you will notice light to moderate cells towards the sunset district, and north bay, mill valley, still scattered showers, down pours as well. into the weekend, this is just the beginning. two storms we are tracking. first one tomorrow morning, 5:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m., strongest rain. sunday, this will pack a punch with rainfall and
of the political science final. please write a scenario where world events and powers provide and results in total thermonuclear warfare results and the next question was, please create a lab practical to test your theory. is there a lab practical to test this theory? haiti. as you know, a few years ago the haitian people suffered an earthquake and the initial problem was crush injuries. yes, infection and dysentery and water supply and all those things would follow fairly soon, but the initial catastrophe was crush injuries, trauma, and the hospitals were gone. so what did we do? the world responded as best it could. what we did, the naval maritime forces, we sent our balts group down there which was patroling the area, we sent the hospital ship comfort down. so you have the comfort on the east coast, you have the mercy on the west coast. the mercy is parked down in san diego. it just got back from its asian humanitarian assistance from guam, indonesia, vietnam, an amazing number of nations we're partnering with. those hospital ships with 1,000 beds, 12 operating rooms, they produce their o
is experimenting with is a program that dhs science and technology created and if you are ready to write it down, you can look online, you can google it, it's called the next generation incident command system or nics. it's a command and control web-based tool that we're looking with mit lincoln labs and dss and i would foresee when we stand up our wing operation center at miramar that the marine corps liaison and the navy liaison and if need be the guard liaison would have access to that tool. the next generation command system is a fantastic web-based command and control technology that we expect to use in the future. with that, thank you. >> thanks. colonel yeager. >> i just want to say you can't underestimate the risk presented by these environments we fly in and really the relationships that we build with cal fire and the training prepares us to mitigate that risk. as rear admiral riveras said, bad things tend it happen at night. they also happen on the weekend and i think we have a 3-day week jepld here but i assure you we are ready to respond. >> from personal experience in 2007, i
, that there is a new science -- repair, renewal, and rehabilitation. that's different from building something new. you cannot fix each and every crack in the city. it's like each city, you're talking about 3,000, 5,000 miles of pipe. so you have to prioritize where they can go and fix the system. narrator: each city faces unique situations, so they must determine the asset management approach that best addresses these challenges. inspections can be done with various technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset to
, the deadline from. while the specific day is not based on science, this is not an arbitrary deadline, we need to make a decision around that time if we're going to do something other than, other than the base case. i would suggest that, if i might , perhaps the wording of the resolution to address what i think is a very clear issue of trust be something along the lines that if we're not able to achieve option 4, that we return to you on the meeting of february 5th, which would be coincidentally on february 1st to explain where we are. >> i personally would have no objection to that. and just to be clear, is it -- the decision under option 4 need to be made by february or all of the preconditions that we've talked about need to be sewed up? i mean, i realize there can be a point in january where it all looks like it's lining up and you and the agency decide, we're going forward with option 4, subject to some contingencies. and if those go bad, it has the negative impacts you talked about. but i think the concern from the community that we're hearing, and i know you hear this, is that we sor
to make an alley oop? he's got that down to a science. >> greg: that go back to what you talked about, clark in terms of understanding the role. >> clark: exactly. >> greg: his responsibility is not to score the basketball, oftentimes it's to be a ball movement and a defensive presence. >> clark: i think his greatest attribute is the energy he brings. he's selfless in how he goes about his work. >> greg: i've said it's not about your stats, it's about your impact. and he impacts the game when he takes the floor. >> tim: withey, who had a triple-double in november against san jose state with a double-double today, 10 points, 10 boards and after the free throw make it 11 points and 10 boards. another young man that played very well off the bench. naadir tharpe. to close it out on. hope that they get the hoop and the harm. shannon scott on a blow-by. that makes it interesting. how about this. >> clark: a two-possession game. there is the bump. then mclemore playing with it -- although it appears that shot might have -- he tipped it in. it may have been
to make an -- deke the shot to make an alley oop? he's got that down to a science. >> greg: that go back to what you talked about, clark, in terms of understanding the role. >> clark: exactly. >> greg: his responsibility is not to score the basketball, oftentimes it's to be a ball movement and a defensive presence. >> clark: i think his greatest attribute is the energy he brings. he's selfless in how he goes about his work. >> greg: i've said it's not about your stats, it's about your impact. and he impacts the game when he takes the floor. >> tim: withey, who had a triple-double in november against san jose state with a double-double today, 10 points, 10 boards, and after the free throw make it 11 points and 10 boards. another young man that played very well off the bench. naadir tharpe. to close it out on. hope that they get the hoop and the harm. shannon scott on a blow-by. that makes it interesting. how about this. >> clark: a two-possession game. there is the bump. then mclemore playing with it -- although it appears that shot might have -- he tipped it in. it may have been too hard
you know science has come a long way and we know a lot more about mental illness and health in general. has health changed though. >> has our mental illness changed in this society or are we recognizing it more? >> we're definitely recognizing it more. if you take someone that's helpless and hopeless and that can occur when someone is depressed or frustrated and doesn't seek -- or someone's got a disorder and is about to go through the juvenile justice system, they feel so helpless no other skills they lash out. this year alone, 5,000 teenagers will commit suicide. 600,000 will attempt suicide and will need an emergency room visit. that statistic is 40 years old. for the last 40 years that's happened every year. we have a way of just ignoring this, of saying these kids are bad seeds or they're just very sick, when in reality, these are our children our sons and daughters, but just more importantly they sit in classes next to our sons and daughters around the world. >> one thing which joe biden's team will be looking at is mental health. what should tha
history of the universe as revealed through occult science in detroit, michigan. i almost used that for my title. he ended up he and his entire family were brutally gruesomely murdered. they were be headed, his children were killed as well, and it was a big sensational story at the time. you can go through the free press archives and find all this coverage and it was never solved. at a certain point i realized it was not far from where i was living so i walked over to check it out and where his house was, so i filed that way and we're the enough, probably a year later there was another murder almost literally across the street. it was a drug thing and these kids were trying to -- their ridge two rival drug houses, they were trying -- these two teenagers were trying to scare off radicals and to do this they ended up killing and then dismembering this guy and scattering body parts around literally across the street from this other murder. again, that was history repeating itself in a way that i found fascinating. i went to the trial and i don't normally cover murder trials. sort of -- i don'
this collaboration of all our national news and science programs. check your local listings. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. we'll see you online and, as it's looking like the end is not upon us yet, again here monday evening. have a nice winter weekend. thanks for joining us. good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to le a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
stands, and talk with dr. sanjay gupta and drew pinsky, about what medical science has learned about the mind of a killer. we'll also look ahead of where do we go from here? especially when it comes to the right to bear arms in the united states, and what president obama called the nation's epidemic of gun violence. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. we begin our special edition of "the situation room" by focusing in on the search for answers. why? why would a 20-year-old man kill his mother, then gun down 20 children and six adults at the sandy hook elementary school before taking his own life? why? police are not the only ones pouring over the evidence, exploring answers. medical investigators are all over this case as well. let's go to our chief medical correspondent dr. sanjay gupta. he is joining us now. now, sanjay, you have been taking a very close look, potentially at the mind of a killer. >> yeah, and that question, why, wolf that you ask, it is hard to say for sure whether there is ever going to be a satisfactory answ
to cooperate with china on many other fronts. we have many other engagements in terms of science and technology, clean energy, collaboration's by our center for disease control, trying to look at the various world health problems, the solutions to which benefit united states as well. we will always have disagreements. we have disagreements with canada on trade issues. we have disagreements with france and mexico and many other countries. there is a mechanism by which we can all go to neutral refereeing of those issues. the wto is one way that we can do that. [inaudible] >> i did not have a chance to read that article. am not familiar with everything that was mentioned in that article. two months before the election, there was this big tough-on- china -- >> the pivot was announced almost a year before that. what set of the discussion of the exhibit was the announcement -- pivot was the announcement of rotating 2000 marines throughout australia. i do not think china should be fearful of 2000 marines hit in australia. -- in australia. our engagement with other countries throughout the asia- pacifi
of -- stems? raise your hand. stands for science, technology, engineering and math, and these are the jobs which are going to be around in the future. actual he the key jobs of the new jersey economy and we should all go to our local councils, our partner organizations, and we're trying to incorporate the significance of stem within schools and colleges around the city, and i challenge every single youth parliament member here today to go away to your cities and councils and partner organizations and try to encourage them to incorporate the significance of stem program within your schools and colleges and come back next year and share with us what you found. these are the jobs of the knowledge economy. >> now, i'm looking for a london woman. a london woman who has not spoken before. have you spoken before? you did. i think it wouldn't be fair to others. i thought you had spoken earlier. this woman is going to fall off her seat and i want to see that. that would be a sadness. >> i'm -- thank you, mr. speaker. thank you. [applause] >> anybody here who knows today that i was desperate to pike
taking part in debates in school and college, they are often rather more about style than sub science. sometimes they appear to miss the point entirely. i remember at the student union, i was president once, we had a motion which instructed the united states to remove its troops instructed the united states that is a bit of big ask. here in this place, debates are different. debates have consequences. the most significant speeches are not necessarily the most stylish or the most fluid. they are the ones born of knowledge, of passion, of commit, and of concern. most of all, they are made by those who are here not only to speak for themselves, but to represent the people. todayed that is your opportunity, to speak out, based on your convictions and concerns to speak for young people whom you represent. and to speak out on issues which are relevant and where you can exert an influence inspect doing so, it will be in the best tradition of parliament democracy. before i finish, can i pay tribute to the administrate colleague. the administrate of children and families who is responsible for
♪ green giant >>> anyone who loves to spend time at san francisco's science museum is moving to pier 15. the last day it will be in its current location on lion street will be january 2. but it takes a lot of time to relocate so many exhibits. the exploretorium will reopen in the new home april 17. it is already a happy holiday season for the oakland zoo. it received a 1 million-dollar donation from someone who wants to remain anonymous. there are no restrictions on how the money can be spent. zoo executives call it the greatest gift they have ever received. especially welcome after last month's election after voters rejected a partial tax to help support the zoo. >>> jerry garcia would sing, if the thunder doesn't get you, the lightning will. >> i woke up and i thought here we go. >> kind of came out of the blue, i thought. >> yes. and we had a few areas isolated, thunderstorms and hail reported in some spots. and that is pushing to the east into the central valley. that is the front moving into the mountains. where the sierra will be getting it, already beginning to see the snowfall.
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)